Nicolai Bergman Hakone Gardens

I had always been curious about Nicolai Bergman, the Danish flower artist whose eponymous shops are a treasure-box of colorful, eye-catching floral creations, both fresh and preserved. Neatly packed into beautifully designed boxes or transformed into flower sculptures, Bergman’s preserved flowers are in a class of their own because they look so natural. Walking by Bergman’s shop in Roppongi Hills or Omotesando, it is difficult to resist the temptation to stop by, if only to have a look at what… Read more »

Hot Spring Hopping in Tohoku (1 ) – Toshichi Onsen

Hitou, or hidden hot springs, are the holy grail for onsen lovers. Often difficult to access, usually exposed to the elements and generally for mixed bathing, hitou are not for the shy or faint-hearted. But for those with fewer inhibitions who enjoy a steaming soak under open skies, surrounded by pristine nature, hitou are the perfect place to relax and rejuvenate and feel at one with the universe. I had a taste of that sense of abandon and oneness with… Read more »

Akito Katsumura’s Ceramic Art Marries Tradition with Contemporary Cool

Japan is a ceramic lover’s paradise, where there are countless talented artists working in clay to create a vast and varied range of goods, from everyday dinnerware and tea ceremony utensils to sculptures and decorative objets. Yet, many of these works, despite commanding a high level of technical expertise and aesthetic sensibility, can only be found at some random pottery fair or a small specialist shop in a remote provincial town. So, it was a delight to receive a postcard… Read more »

Karuizawa – A Tale of Two Shoppers

The day felt like somewhere between late winter and early spring as we dashed to Tokyo station and jumped on an early Shinkansen train to the mountain resort town of Karuizawa hoping for some retail therapy and much needed relaxation in hotspring baths at Hoshino Onsen. It was the perfect time to visit without the crowds of spring, summer and autumn. We’d heard about the infamous two-hour taxi ride through unreasonable seasonal traffic from Karuizawa station to the outer reaches… Read more »

Yoshizawa – Refined Kaiseki in the Heart of Roppongi

The minute we stepped through the traditional wood and stone entrance to Yoshizawa we were spirited away from the contemporary minimalism of Roppongi Hills, where this acclaimed Japanese restaurant is located, into a serene world of sliding doors and aromatic incense.  As we were led to our seats along a narrow, paved corridor flanked by private rooms behind sliding doors and latticed shoji screens, we could almost pretend we were walking along a pathway in 18th century Kyoto. We had… Read more »

Innovative Kaiseki at Waketokuyama

In a video created by the Onigiri Society, a non-profit that disseminates information on Japanese rice balls, Hiromitsu Nozaki, the chef proprietor of Japanese restaurant Waketokuyama, http://japonica.info/waketokuyama-refined-japanese-cuisine-in-elegant-surroundings/ talks about his love of rice and, particularly, of onigiri rice balls. He reminisces about coming home from school and finding huge onigiri in the cabinet, which his mother had made for him as a snack. For Nozaki, those rice balls were full of his mother’s love for him. Such memories and the clear… Read more »

Peter Tasker’s Favorite Things

Where do you live and why do you live there? For the last 15 years, I’ve been living in Nakameguro in central Tokyo. It’s outside the Yamanote Line belt, yet amazingly convenient. When the weather allows, I walk to my office near Aoyama Gakuin University (in Shibuya) in about 40 minutes. The Hibiya Line gives easy access to Ginza and the business district. The Toyoko Line express takes you in two stops to Shinjuku 3-chome and entertainment districts, which would… Read more »

Fran Kuzui's profile photo

Fran Kuzui’s Favorite Things

Where do you live and why do you choose to live there?  Although I have homes in New York and in Tokyo, I like to think I live in the present moment. It’s certainly where I choose to live rather than being attached to some place. You could say that means there’s very low maintenance. Do you have a local haunt? A cafe or bar? Somewhere you go for comfort food or just a chat with the proprietor? The last… Read more »

  • Yoshizawa – Refined Kaiseki in the Heart of Roppongi

    The minute we stepped through the traditional wood and stone entrance to Yoshizawa we were spirited away from the contemporary minimalism of Roppongi Hills, where this acclaimed Japanese restaurant is located, into a serene world of sliding doors and aromatic incense.  As we were led to our seats along a narrow, paved corridor flanked by private rooms behind sliding doors and latticed shoji screens, we could almost pretend we were walking along a pathway in 18th century Kyoto. We had… Read more »

  • Innovative Kaiseki at Waketokuyama

    In a video created by the Onigiri Society, a non-profit that disseminates information on Japanese rice balls, Hiromitsu Nozaki, the chef proprietor of Japanese restaurant Waketokuyama, http://japonica.info/waketokuyama-refined-japanese-cuisine-in-elegant-surroundings/ talks about his love of rice and, particularly, of onigiri rice balls. He reminisces about coming home from school and finding huge onigiri in the cabinet, which his mother had made for him as a snack. For Nozaki, those rice balls were full of his mother’s love for him. Such memories and the clear… Read more »

  • Nicolai Bergman Hakone Gardens

    I had always been curious about Nicolai Bergman, the Danish flower artist whose eponymous shops are a treasure-box of colorful, eye-catching floral creations, both fresh and preserved. Neatly packed into beautifully designed boxes or transformed into flower sculptures, Bergman’s preserved flowers are in a class of their own because they look so natural. Walking by Bergman’s shop in Roppongi Hills or Omotesando, it is difficult to resist the temptation to stop by, if only to have a look at what… Read more »

  • Hot Spring Hopping in Tohoku (1 ) – Toshichi Onsen

    Hitou, or hidden hot springs, are the holy grail for onsen lovers. Often difficult to access, usually exposed to the elements and generally for mixed bathing, hitou are not for the shy or faint-hearted. But for those with fewer inhibitions who enjoy a steaming soak under open skies, surrounded by pristine nature, hitou are the perfect place to relax and rejuvenate and feel at one with the universe. I had a taste of that sense of abandon and oneness with… Read more »

  • Peter Tasker’s Favorite Things

    Where do you live and why do you live there? For the last 15 years, I’ve been living in Nakameguro in central Tokyo. It’s outside the Yamanote Line belt, yet amazingly convenient. When the weather allows, I walk to my office near Aoyama Gakuin University (in Shibuya) in about 40 minutes. The Hibiya Line gives easy access to Ginza and the business district. The Toyoko Line express takes you in two stops to Shinjuku 3-chome and entertainment districts, which would… Read more »

  • Fran Kuzui's profile photo

    Fran Kuzui’s Favorite Things

    Where do you live and why do you choose to live there?  Although I have homes in New York and in Tokyo, I like to think I live in the present moment. It’s certainly where I choose to live rather than being attached to some place. You could say that means there’s very low maintenance. Do you have a local haunt? A cafe or bar? Somewhere you go for comfort food or just a chat with the proprietor? The last… Read more »

  • Natsuko Toda’s Favorite Things

    1. Where do you live and why did you choose to live there? I was born in Tokyo and lived in Setagaya ward until I was about 20. When Hiroo Garden Hills was developed, it looked like a good place to live. Back then, you could only buy an apartment there if you won a lottery. I was lucky I won the lottery and was able to buy an apartment, probably because it was on the fourth floor. (The number 4 in Japanese is… Read more »

  • Atsuko Gatling’s Favorite Things

    We asked Atsuko Gatling, a native of Tokyo’s trendy Aoyama neighborhood, about her favorite places, pastimes and more. Where do you live and why did you choose that neighborhood? I live in Minami-Aoyama where I was born and raised in a single-family home, which is now a condominium. Although my husband and I have moved several times, I have always lived in Minato-ku (where Aoyama is located), so it’s really my home. My mother, when she was alive, lived here as… Read more »

  • Maison KEI – A Touch of France at the Foot of Mt Fuji

    Social distancing restrictions triggered by the coronavirus outbreak have yielded a few modest upsides, including making it much easier to book a table, even at the most popular restaurants in Japan — with the exception of some very special destinations, including Maison KEI. Even though it is located in Gotenba, a city of less than 36,000, a good hour-and-a-half drive southwest of Tokyo, trying to book a table at this French restaurant requires patience, determination and above all, luck. We… Read more »

  • Takato Tamagami’s Favorite Things

    We asked Takato Tamagami, a Tokyo-based architect, about his favorite places, pastimes and more. Where do you live and why did you choose that neighborhood? I live with my wife and two children in Hatsudai, which is where my office is. What I like about this neighborhood is that it’s easy to get to both Shibuya and Shinjuku, so it’s very convenient and there are lots of places to eat. Hatsudai also retains the atmosphere of shitamachi, densely populated old Tokyo… Read more »

  • Staring Out to Sea at Hiramatsu Atami

    If you need a quick getaway from the hubbub of Tokyo and appreciate good French cuisine and a stunning sea view, try the Hiramatsu Hotel in Atami, which is just a two-hour drive from the heart of the Japanese capital. The hotel is part of the Hiramatsu group of restaurants and hotels, best known for its main restaurant in Tokyo’s Hiroo neighborhood. As the cuisine is decidedly French, this may not be an ideal gourmet experience for those who prefer… Read more »

  • Autumn in Kyoto Offers a Feast of Colors and Seasonal Dishes

    Autumn is one of the best times to enjoy Kyoto in all its glory. The weather is generally mild and the city’s historic temple grounds and gardens are transformed into a kaleidoscope of fiery autumnal colors. It is also the season to sample some of Japanese cuisine’s most beloved ingredients, such as matsutake mushrooms, It is impossible to predict when nature will perform its magic on the maples, gingko and beech trees that adorn Kyoto’s famous architectural sites and surrounding… Read more »